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Why is construction work so dangerous?

Construction sites in Ohio and across the country are more dangerous than most other workplaces. For that reason, construction company owners and their site managers have to pay significant attention to employee safety. Employers are responsible for providing work environments that are free of known hazards.

Construction site dynamics

Workplaces in most other industries remain at fixed locations where workers come and go each day for years. They encounter similar risks each day, and the occasional safety meeting reminds them not to become complacent. In contrast, construction sites change from day to day and sometimes from one hour to the next. Construction workers face many potentially life-threatening risks every hour of each shift they work.

Construction risk types

Safety authorities say the risk systems on construction sites are intensifying and dynamic, and they can be classified into two main types.

  • Normal risks: These hazards are always present, such as high work platforms, crane work and concrete casting.
  • Increased risks: These are the combined risks present when doing two normal risks jobs.

Safety training

For this reason, training and instructions for construction workers never stop. Daily safety meetings are crucial to prepare workers for the particular hazards they will face that day. Furthermore, as circumstances change during the day, employers might have to brief workers to ensure they are aware of potential risks. Employers need to understand that safety training is not the employees’ responsibility but theirs.

Injured workers’ rights to compensation

The workers’ compensation insurance program covers injured workers in Ohio. It is a no-fault program that pays benefits regardless of who caused the incident that led to a worker’s injuries. Typical compensation covers medical expenses and lost wages for the period of temporary disability. Additional benefits could be awarded if injuries cause permanent disabilities.